More Yarn Will Do The Trick

Saturday, 26 October 2013

River reflections

Sometimes you just don't appreciate what you've got on your own doorstep. A couple of days ago when I was feeling at a really low ebb, I decided to put on a brave face and get some fresh air.  It was a beautiful day, not a cloud in the blue sky, with just a slight chill in the autumn air. So I persuaded P he'd also like a hike, swathed myself in my woolly creations and off we went for a walk along the river.

The Ouse is only a few hundred metres away, so we were quite surprised to see it was already threatening to flood after the recent heavy rain. York has spent much time and money on flood defences, so to see the river so high after not really a lot of rain was quite shocking.
There's a wide tow path, then usually a steep 2m/6foot slope to a narrower path and the river. But as you can see the lower tow path is completely submerged.
Good weather for geese though. I know they're a nuisance, but Canada Geese hold fond memories for me - when Izzi and Ava were tiny, we used to bring them down to the river to feed the ducks. The ducks didn't get a look in what with the geese and sea gulls, but the girls would whoop with delight when I tried to shoo them away.
Love the reflections of this medieval keep, coupled with the crisp autumnal colours...

... especially the ripple around this particular goose.
This is the view the other way, back to Clifton bridge.
And here's Lendal bridge, where we planned to leave the river and get some veggies in the market. In typically Victorian Gothic style, it sports an ornate parapet featuring the white rose of York, the crossed keys of the Diocese of York and the Lions of England.
The first bridge was designed by William Dredge in 1860, but in 1861 the bridge collapsed during construction and five men were killed. Thomas Page, who designed Westminster Bridge in London, was brought in to redesign Lendal Bridge, opening in 1863.
Before we left the tow path we were surprised to find that since we last passed this way, a new restaurant had popped up.  This was not just any old restaurant, but an impressive construction with raised terrace overlooking the river (suppose it would have to be to avoid the floods) - a fabulous meeting of old and new architecture.
Located in the old Engine House, lovingly restored by Andrew Pern, chef/owner of the Star at Harome, the new extension tastefully complements the older building, opening out onto a wooden deck overlooking the river towards Lendal bridge.
The menu uses the best local produce God's own country has to offer, served up with a large dose of all-important Yorkshire hospitality.
©York Mix
Back entrance through the city walls.
When we eventually dragged ourselves away, we wandered on to the market where the Food Festival was in full swing. Was rather taken by this Italian Choco Passion stall, until I saw that many of the chocolates came in the shapes of guns, knives, handcuffs and skulls - not my taste at all in chocolate!!
After buying some gorgeous black kale and purple sprouting broccoli we set off back past these lazily parked bikes that abound in York.
The Minster was looking suitably grand and imposing, bathed in the mellow autumn sunshine.
Rose Window was looking good too.
By the time we got back home, I'd shed some of the cobwebs and we were welcomed by two hungry cats reminding us it's teatime. We just had time for a refreshing cup of Earl Grey in the garden before the sun went down...
... admiring the pumpkins waiting for Halloween.

Maybe things aren't too bad after all :)

4 comments:

  1. Jean, I could so enjoy a tow path where I live ! What a great meandering and into town, you really live a lovely life of art, curiosity, and seem full of delightful mischief. Ah, and the kittens are looking adorable...

    ReplyDelete
  2. I loved the walk round York_ I hadn't realised we were such close neighbours! It was a lovely day yesterday- bit blustery today!

    ReplyDelete
  3. You can't beat a good riparian walk to lift your spirits! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Riparian - thanks for teaching me a new word Susie :)

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for dropping by, please leave your message here.